6x9book.xslt generates 8.5x11 pdf?

Hi. Pardon the ignorance, but…

I’ve used Scrivener to generate manuscripts for a number of books I shipped to lulu.com to be printed at 6x9 paperbacks. Today when I tried that, lulu.com complained that the pdf I had shipped it was 8.5x11 and I had selected 6x9.

My setup is as follows (and it’s been known to work in the past; not this year, but I don’t try to publish a book every year). I use Scrivener 1.54, do a Compile Draft selecting MultiMarkdown --> LaTeX, export, run it through TeXShop (twice, to allow the table of contents file to be created correctly), and it spits out a PDF file.

Multimarkdown settings: Title, Author, Base Header Level, XSLT file (set to 6x9book.xslt), Date, and format=complete

This all seems like black magic to me; I’ve hacked LaTeX some, but it’s been a while, and, as I said, it used to work.

Help?

Hmm, it sounds like, for some reason, the XSLT is not getting properly set. When you open the tex file in TeXShop, do a search for this line:

\setstocksize{9in}{6in}

If you don’t see that line, then chances are high you aren’t actually using the 6x9book.xslt. One thing to note, and this is very likely all that is wrong (and thus a case of mere White Magic going afoul), is that you mentioned your meta-data is “XSLT file (set to 6x9book.xslt)” Some time in the past year or two. MMD was updated so that you could use different XSLTs for different export formats. You can now have an XHTML XSLT for instance. Consequently, the meta-data format has been altered and now when you are using LaTeX, you must specifically state that in the meta-data. It should look something like:

Title: Something Author: You LaTeX XSLT: 6x9book.xslt Format: complete

For a while MMD allowed the old meta-data format to work as a deprecated feature, which might be why your stuff was working until some point within the last year. I don’t remember precisely when that happened, but it has been a while.

If you are using LaTeX XSLT, then something else is the matter and we’ll investigate things further.

Okay, using “LaTeX XSLT” instead of “XSLT file” does actually produce the indicated code in the .tex file.

Thanks!

Great! Glad to be of help.