"Chapter" is being inserted into my chapter headings

Hi all, apologies if this is a silly question. I’m having an issue with exporting to MMD. I’m using the titles in the binder as section headings, which has been working just fine. It’s outputting markdown like this:

IRB Exercise

I recently created a new project which is not working. It’s outputting section headings like this:

Chapter 1

Animation Exercises

or

Chapter 2

Answers

Adding a spurious “Chapter x” line, and adding newlines. It seems to be doing this for every folder. I’ve compared my compilation settings, but can find no difference. The only difference I can think of is that I have always started blank projects before, but this time I started a non-fiction project.

Google won’t tell me. Does anyone have any ideas?

Thanks in advance.

I’ve just checked the compile settings for the non-fiction project and at Formatting the default is to add Chapter as boilerplate text: you can see this in the Level settings pane.

If you delete the extra text there it should compile without inserting chapter.

I do want “chapter” to be inserted into my chapter headings, but not into introduction or conclusion: those are no chapters.
How do I set Scrivener to understand that?

MultiMarkdown itself doesn’t have a way of distinguishing between sections that are numbered and those that aren’t. It’s something I work around by inserting raw code, one way or another. Such a solution is highly dependent upon which output format is intended, since you are essentially bypassing MMD to write into the output file itself.

But if on the other hand you are using Scrivener to number chapters and insert formal headings rather than the output format’s style systems, it might be easiest to just flip the “Compile As-Is” flag on, which will inhibit it from inserting an MMD heading for that section, and type it in yourself into the main text editor, as you want it to appear in the output.

With Scrivener 3 the answer to this question would be more along the lines of having two types of documents, those that are chapters and those that are informal sections, and setting up how those are handled by the compiler. The system you’re working with right now is more procedural, where things are “types” based on their level and icon type. That is another way of going about this: messing with those variables. If you use folders for chapters for example, and these two sections are just files at the same level as those folders, then you can set up the compiler to treat files at that level differently than folders at that level.