Chapter numbering issue

I have Scrivener set up to insert a number ( <$n> ) at the beginning of a new chapter. So far so good. 1, 2, etc.

The fubar du jour begins when I commit a writing sin such as trying to sneak in a one-sentence paragraph at the chapter’s beginning, the compile winds up with a new chapter number inserted thereafter. I suspect the little darlin’ is showing me the errors of my ways, which I may have fixed by adding another sentence… I don’t know yet, I haven’t recompiled yet to see if that fixes it.

OS: Windows 7, Compile to Word.

Thoughts?

Ah, there I go again…

Cheers!
CyberDave358

How exactly do you have the compile formatting set to add the chapter number, and how is your binder structured? A screenshot showing the binder with the problem area in context would help. Also how/where are you sneaking in your paragraph? Is this part of the same document as the rest of the text, or in a separate location?

Jennifer,

Thanks for responding. I finally did do a compile to see if the single sentence was at issue, and it looks like it is. Was. Adding another line to the paragraph corrected the numbering issue that was tormenting me.

You asked for screenshots, and I’m not sure how to put the little darlin’ in this post. What I did, I put the <$n> tag in the Text Separator, Folder Separator, and the Folder and Text Separator fields; and Single Return in the ‘Folder and the Text Separator’ field; all under the ‘Separator’ menu item in the Compile setup utility.

This gives me a number at the beginning of each chapter and it picks up in the next folder.

Any feedback? I’m still figuring this thing out little by little and lot by few.
Thanks, Jennifer!
Cheers!
CyberDave358

Would it be possible for you to attach a sample project demonstrating the issue or send it to windows.support AT literatureandlatte DOT com with a reference back to this thread? (You can attach a file via the “Upload Attachment” tab below the text area when you’re typing your post.) It does sound like a bug with the custom separators, but I haven’t been able to reproduce the specific triggers in just playing with a test project of my own. There are a lot of pieces that could be factors, so a sample project that’s definitely giving this output would be easiest to work with. You can use Save As to create a copy of your current project and then delete any extra material from that, so long as when it’s compiled the problem of the misplaced spacer is evident. (Be sure to Save As first, before deleting!) Then just use File > Back Up > Back Up To… to create a zipped copy that you can upload or email and trash the sample project so it doesn’t get confused with your real project.

That aside, is there a reason you’re using the separators to apply the numbering as opposed to entering them as a title prefix for the different document types where you want it? That might give you more consistent results–at any rate, it should avoid this particular bug.

“That aside, is there a reason you’re using the separators to apply the numbering as opposed to entering them as a title prefix for the different document types where you want it? That might give you more consistent results–at any rate, it should avoid this particular bug.”

Jennifer,
Mainly, I’ve done it this way because I don’t know what I’m doing, not yet anyway. BTW, I just downloaded and installed the latest update and made the same compile format changes to the first novel as I did to the second, and the results are different. Not better different, more confusing. Oy! Not that the update has anything to do with it, maybe I’m just holding my mouth wrong.

I’ll put together a sample and forward it as you’d requested in the previous post here before long.

Cheers!

Later…
I sent the project for your considerations to windows.support@literatureandlatte.com to demonstrate what was happening. (My fix was to add one or more sentences to single-sentence paragraphs in initial chapter paragraphs.)