Document Templates and ease of Compiling mutually exclusive?

My question is: Should the use of Scrivener’s Document Templates feature be avoided, as it makes compiling the book too much manual work?

I use Scrivener’s Document Templates feature quite a lot. The Document Template I use for scenes contains sections like “Mood”, “Conflicts” or “Characters’ Motivations”, and a handful more. This feature makes it a lot easier for me to work on different scenes at the same time and review scene consistency without having to read the entire scene text each time.

I first tried to put this meta information into the Inspector, but found that Document Templates enabled me to evaluate different aspects of a scene at one glance, instead of switching constantly between Inspector panes.

So, a scene text for me looks like this:
First Time Alone
Mood: xxxxxx
Conflicts: xxxxxx
Motivation: xxxxxxx
Scene Goal: xxxxxxx
etc.
Scene Text: “Wow, I cannot believe that we actually escaped the crowd!” Frank’s eyes met Anny’s for a moment. xxxxx

The challenge I found was that when I Compile the book, all of the text, including the text from “Mood:” to “Scene Text:” is included in the document that is created. Obviously, as Scrivener cannot know which parts to exclude.

Searching for some code to instruct the Compile pass to exclude the upper part of the text, I only found the Compile option to exclude strikethrough text. If this were the solution for excluding text from compilation, I would have to write the complete text before the actual scene text in strikethrough font, which makes the text very hard to read. Past forum threads I found on the topic on exclusion from compiling pointed in the same direction.

Did I miss something - is there a Compile command that can be put into scene text that excludes text from being compiled? Like…

First Time Alone

Mood: xxxxxx
Conflicts: xxxxxx
Motivation: xxxxxxx
Scene Goal: xxxxxxx
etc.
Scene Text: “Wow, I cannot believe that we actually escaped the crowd!” Frank’s eyes met Anny’s for a moment. xxxxx

…to use a HTML analogy.

If such a directive does not exist, I would very much like to understand what is the use case for Document Templates, if the template text cannot be excluded from compilation. Maybe I understood the use cases completely wrong.

Thanks a lot - and thanks for making Scrivener! When I started using the product, I had no idea how much easier it would make editing.

I would use inline annotations for this, as that is exactly what inline annotations are set up for - keeping notes inside a text document that won’t necessarily appear in the output.

Select the text you want excluded from Compile and go to Format > Inline Annotation. This will change the text to red and put a bubble around it. Click into the text, bring up the colour palette (shift-cmd-C) and you can change the bubble and text colour to something different if you don’t like the red.

Then, in the “Footnotes & Comments” pane of Compile, be sure to set it up to delete annotations. Remember that the bubble must appear around all the text you wanted deleted, including any whitespace.

Hope that helps.

All the best,
Keith

Thanks a lot, Keith, I had completely forgotten about annotations.

One caveat, though. It seems that when using a table, only the text is removed from printing, not the table itself, even though it may be surrounded completely by the red bubble. :astonished:

I can’t reproduce that - are you talking specifically about the Windows version? That may be a Windows bug.

Yes, it’s Scrivener 1.6 for Windows.

A table used in a text document, even if converted entirely into an inline note, still gets printed the empty cells.