Dropbox Sync in Linux?

Though I have heard about Scrivener for a long time, I have only just downloaded the Linux beta. I think that I may purchase it for the Mac as well; but I do most of my work on my Linux machine, and only use the Mac occasionally. I understand that I cannot expect the Linux version of Scrivener to be as advanced and polished as the Mac version.

My problem is this. I generally write in markdown, and then use pandoc to convert it into html, rtf, or pdf-via-LaTeX, depending on circumstances. I keep my files synced between all my devices via Dropbox; when not at home, I usually write on my iPad. This works well for short documents, but is a bit cumbersome for longer ones. I tend to divide longer projects into separate shorter files, which I can work on individually, and combine them afterwards. Scrivener seems like it will be excellent for this. However, as far as I can tell, only Scrivener for Mac offers the possibility of syncing projects in Dropbox. Is there any way that I can do such synchronizing with Scrivener for Linux? I’d just like to be able to work on individual short files on my iPad, and have them sync back to the Draft folder in the Scrivener project. Can I do this?

thanks

https://forum.literatureandlatte.com/t/seeing-dropbox-right/12597/1

There’s a post. The Windows and Linux versions are similar enough that it should cover it. (With the caveat that I don’t use dropbox.)

Thanks for referring me to this thread. I also read some other threads on using Dropbox with Scrivener (but they dated from a year and a half ago – I think before “Sync with external folder” became an option in the Mac version of Scrivener. But I am trying to find out whether an equivalent for “sync with external folder” would be possible with Scrivener for Linux.

Specifically, what I want to do is this. A project in Scrivener for me will be based around a Drafts folder consisting entirely of plain-text files (not rtf) written in (multi)markdown. What I would like to do is to be able to edit these markdown files individually on my iPad, accessing the files through Dropbox. Any changes I made on those files would be sync’ed back through Dropbox to my home computer, so that the changed text would be there when I returned to that machine and opened Scrivener again. I don’t need for the Research folder to be available on the iPad, nor for all the other capacities of Scrivener to be replicated on the iPad. I just want to be able to rewrite/revise individual bits of prose, and have them put back into the .scriv file/folder afterwards, so that I can process them at home.

Here is somebody who has done just this with Scrivener for Mac:

jamierubin.net/2012/01/04/sc … -the-ipad/

I just want to be able to do the same, despite the fact that Scrivener for Linux does not yet have “Sync with external folder.”

That is correct, you are referring to the File/Sync/with External Folder feature that allows one to specify portions (or all of) the Binder, which will be exported to a selected file format. This folder will then be monitored on future project close and open actions, and changes in the project or on the disk will trigger a synchronisation, which brings them both up to date as best as possible.

The sort of Dropbox usage that is currently available to all platforms is just common sense, putting your “project.scriv” folder in the Dropbox area so that it is accessible for more than one computer without having to go through a transfer procedure.

I know that synchronisation is something we have higher on the to do list as more people are using their smartphones and such to take notes and make small edits. But I can’t give you an ETA on when it will appear.

I’m able to use multiple Windows and Linux computers with Dropbox easily. I just save-as into a private Dropbox folder, and I can open it on any machine I want to. (To note, you have to make sure you’ve exited Scrivener on the last machine you were working on it on first, or it’ll still see the project as open and loading it into a second instance of Scrivener at the time could screw things up.)