feature suggestions

HI Keith-
I’m really enjoying your software, very nice work, but have a couple of suggestions for improvement.

One thing that I find challenging is that you can’t tell what scriptwriting style you’re writing in without either looking at the status bar or waiting until you hit return. Is there some way, similar to final draft, say, that the cursor could move to the proper position after you hit return/tab?

Also, having recently lost about three weeks worth of work, how about some sort of a backup feature similar to what exists in Final Draft? Because the backup folder is kept in another location on the drive, it makes it very difficult to accidentally destroy any doc, and also makes it possible to return to earlier versions.

Just a couple of thoughts…
Best,
jeff

Might I suggest that you have a look at Time Machine (under Leopard) or some other backup solution? Three weeks of work is more than I would trust to any application-specific backup tool.

Katherine

Thanks Katherine, I have Time Capsule. Long story, my OS got corrupted, had to reinstall without preferences and in the process lost my work (and deleted my time machine file because it would have had the same corruption). The other unfortunate thing - even though I realized it right away, it was impossible to recover the deleted file, because no data recovery programs that I could find recognized scrivener files, and even if they did, it’s very hard to recover deleted files on a mac. Maybe a freak accident, but stuff does happen with computers, and unfortunately, I’m used to having automated backups. As a result, my scrivener file was the only file where I lost work - I didn’t lose any of my work in either of my other word processing programs. Even if you were simply able to automate snapshots, that would be a big improvement.

I use SmartBackup for my Backups.
Its set via iCal so backup at 8 PM every day and it works great :slight_smile:
SO maybe this could be a solution for you.

In my experience, Time Machine is quite useless. It’s bloatware, unbelievably slow and tends to corrupt files. So I ditched it two days after installing Leopard^^

Hi,

Thanks for your kind words about Scrivener.

I’m not sure what you mean about scriptwriting - the cursor should go to the right position. Are you using Tiger? I do remember seeing behaviour where the cursor appeared to be at the start of a line until you started typing occasionally on Tiger, I think, but I haven’t seen it on Leopard (I believe it was just a quirk of the way typing attributes work in the OS X text system). If you could tell me the circumstances under which this happens, that would help.

As for back up… I am looking into adding an option for automatically invoking “Backup To…” upon exit or at regular intervals for the next update, though I can’t promise anything. You certainly aren’t the only person to want this, though, so it is on my list.

Thanks and all the best,
Keith

Keith, I think this happens regularly with Swift Publisher 2, which looks to me like it’s built on the OS-X text system. I’ve been running it under 10.5.2, but I’ve given up for the moment … too many issues with long documents, and it would be easier in the end if I simply rebooted from the external into Tiger and used InDesign CS1. For much of what I do, NWP will also do well … except for floating text boxes and NWPs limited positioning of images on the page. But I’ll check it out for you.
If my memory’s right, in SP2, if you follow an indented or centred paragraph with a non-indented paragraph, the cursor will remain in the position for the previous paragraph until you actually type something.

Mark

Thanks all. Keith I will get back to you on the specific behavior, but it happened for me in Tiger and it’s happening in Leopard. I’ll try to pinpoint the exact keystrokes and style patterns. Again, great program, and I’m using despite my lost work, which should say a lot!
Best,
Jeff

When you said you lost work, I assumed you meant it was either a hard drive crash or something you did (user error)? Are you saying Scrivener somehow lost your work? It shouldn’t do that - if it did, please provide full details.
Thanks and all the best,
Keith

Oh no, user error, totally my fault. I described what happened in my earlier post. Didn’t mean to suggest it was Scrivener’s fault!!
Best,
Jeff

Hi Keith-
Looked again, the cursor is in fact moving properly in Leopard. Weird, I could have sworn it was still happening, even went back to old scenes to see if it happened there, but it’s clean. Sorry for the false alarm.
Best,
Jeff

Okay Keith, it did it again - after I finish typing dialogue, with my return key set to character, the cursor goes to the ‘dialogue point’ until I start typing. Same thing happens when I type in the character format and hit return (set to dialogue) - until I start typing, the cursor, is at the beginning point for ‘character’.

This seems to be an intermittent issue for me in Leopard. When I tested it this morning it worked fine; then, the problem reoccurred.
Thanks,
Jeff

Hi Keith,

Thanks for the recent help. Am trying out Scrivener and loving it so far. Really enjoy seeing the word and character count change in the footer. Great way to check my progress throughout the day.

Since I had issues importing documents - issues with index card creation actually - I’d like to suggest a little something that might be an improvement. It would seem great to me anyway. I’m not a programmer, so I don’t know how easy or hard it would be, but…

I import a document and it loads into Scrivener. Can you create programming code so that I could select some text, then right-click (control-click) and an option would appear: Create Index Card.? That way for those users like me who have considerable bodies of text in other word processors (well, mine’s all in Word.) we could bring it into Scrivener and selectively create linked Index Cards to different parts of the text. As far as I’m concerned, that would be a simple and elegant way to accomplish this.

Hope it’s easily possible.

Otherwise, only have kudos to offer so far. Really enjoying your creation.

Paul

Hi Paul,

Glad you’re liking things so far. I think that you might not be quite getting the relationship between index cards and text just yet - having multiple index cards associated with one piece of text would kind of defeat the object. Each text document has one index card associated with it which acts as a synopsis of that text document. The text document might constitute (in a novel in this example) a scene, or a paragraph, or a chapter, or whatever. If it constituted a scene, then you could use the corkboard to rearrange those scenes by looking only at a short synopsis of each.

To me, it sounds as though you may want to chop up your long document in Scrivener using the Documents > Split at Selection feature. You can add a synopsis to the index card for each document split from the main one (so that instead of having one long document you will have several smaller ones). All of these component documents get compiled into one long document when you export or print using Compile Draft.

Hope that helps.
All the best,
Keith

Hi Keith,

Oh no no no. I understood the relationship. I guess I was thinking that when I click, drag and highlight some imported text, then right click to find a selection: Create Index Card, that the whole idea would be it would grab that highlighted text and create a separate document of it, now linked to the newly created Index Card. Basically, it’s collapsing the whole Split function into a means to break up the document AND create an Index card to the broken off piece at the same time. THAT’S what I’m suggesting.

Worth thinking about?

You the boss.

Just an idea.

Paul

Already exists. Every document already has an associated index card. As soon as you split the document (or create a new document by any other means), you’ll get a new index card to go with the new piece.

Katherine

And if you have the inspector open you will see “Synopsis” will have the title of the new document displayed. Click the button on the right hand end of the Synopsis title bar and the index card will be populated with the first bit of the text as the synopsis, or you can simply type in what you want.