How to set paragraph indent relative to font size

In chinese, paragraph indent is usually set to 2 character width, how to set this in scrivener?

It might depend on the font you are using, which might be different when you compile. That said:

  1. make sure you can see the ruler and set the first line indent marker to the point between the second and third characters in the text and a tab marker at the same point—I’m not sure that the tab marker is necessary, but I have one there anyway; here’s what it should look like (I am using Songti SC 13pt):

[attachment=0]Screenshot 2020-12-11 at 15.58.37.png[/attachment]
2) Go to either Scrivener > Preferences > Editing > Formatting and click “Use Formatting in Current Editor” to set it as default for all your projects; or “Project > Project Settings… > Formatting” and click “Use Current” to apply it to this project only.

  1. Those settings on their own only work for new text, so to apply them to all existing text, open your document in Scrivenings Mode and go to “Documents > Convert > Text to Defaukt Formatting…”

Hope that helps.

马克

This is not directly pertinent, but the question made me wonder why paragraph indent settings aren’t specifiable in ems — which would be font and font-size relative. Off-hand this would seem like it would be typographically desirable. Now I am going to have pull up InDesign to see if ems-indenting is a thing.

I think it might well be in Roman or other alphabetical text. Chinese is like a monospaced font but doesn’t use spaces; punctuation marks, parentheses, etc. are given the same width as characters.

丨鼈 。( all have the same space allocated. Note 。 is at the left of the space and ( is at the right…

So if you know the point width assigned to a character, you could set it in points, but I don’t think the concept of an em, or of x-height and other typographic/calligraphic measures have any relevance.

:slight_smile:

Mark

I think it might well be in Roman or other alphabetical text. Chinese is like a monospaced font but doesn’t use spaces; punctuation marks, parentheses, etc. are given the same width as characters.

丨鼈 。( all have the same space allocated. Note 。 is at the left of the space and ( is at the right…

So if you know the point width assigned to a character, you could set it in points, but I don’t think the concept of an em, or of x-height and other typographic/calligraphic measures have any relevance.

:slight_smile:

Mark

Thanks, Mark. Indeed, this is the reason my comment was “not directly pertinent” to the case.

Thanks, I know this way to set indent, just wondering if there is a way to set indent with font size, using em, not absolute unit.

As I said to GR, the concept of ‘el’, ‘en’ or ‘em’ is irrelevant in Chinese as all characters have the same width irrespective of the number of strokes. It is relevant in Roman scripts because letters occupy different widths, especially in proportional fonts. Furthermore the spacing between characters in Roman scripts can be adjusted by kerning; in Chinese, kerning is again irrelevant. To expand this slightly, I imagine the same concepts are relevant in some non-Roman alphabetical scripts like Thai and some other South-Asian and South-East Asian Languages; I am not sure about Cyrillic-scripts.

On a quick test, Songti SC 13pt allocates 13 pixels width per character, so for a two character indent, you need 26 px; at 24 pt, you need 48 px. So basically, with that font, your indent in pixels should be twice the character size in points. What font do you use? My suspicion it will be the same ratio unless you are using a really calligraphic font.

Mark

Still, Mark, the concept of an em has an obvious extension to the Chinese typeface — it just turns out to be the character width of every character. Presumably this is actually what you would get in CSS if you use em units to scale things over a Chinese base font.

The OP was hoping for a way to set the indent of a paragraph that would be programmatically tied to the character width or em of the font setting of the paragraph. So, if you changed the base font setting, the indent would automatically adjust. Just as one can do this in CSS for a web page, scaling various elements in multiples of the em of the base setting of the font.

It’s a nice idea. I’ve just never noted such an option in any “word processing” or typesetting environment. (There may well be technical reasons for this. For example, if you actually looked at how your edited text in Word is broken internally into spans you would be appalled.)