I absolutely HATE Scrivern's Compile "feature"!

They are:
Beans (51%), Tomatoes (34%), Water, Sugar, Modified Cornflour, Spirit Vinegar, Salt, Spice Extracts, Herb Extract.

but what is is supposed to be?

and if you say “baked beans” I think I my stump my go the way of my head.

Actually I think even Heinz has stopped calling them ‘Baked Beans’ in favour of the more… well, I’m not sure I know the adjective… ‘Heinz Beanz’.

those things truly support the, what I believe to be incorrect, international condemnation of British culinary skills. I’m not sure those wold be legal to feed animals here.

Hideous. Horrid. A staple of every breakfast I ate there. I felt right at home.

I agree with you that those “Has Beans” are horrid, though there are those that like them — and even insist they are a necessary ingredient of Shepherd’s Pie! — presumably they are ‘comfort food’ for them, fed to them as a child and at school. I had them at school and ate them because I was hungry. Fortunately, we lived around the world, so they never appeared at home.

But I’m not sure that it is fair to blame us Brits, since Heinz, who first inflicted them on us, was an American company and presumably brought them over from America — along with tomato ketchup and the dreaded tinned "spaghetti in tomato sauce”. The only beans I remember in England from my childhood, apart from “Has Beans” are butter beans, which were just boiled and drained — no tomato sauce — and any cold left over butter beans were fried up next morning with the bacon. They were good!

Mr X

I agree with you that those “Has Beans” are horrid, though there are those that like them — and even insist they are a necessary ingredient of Shepherd’s Pie! — presumably they are ‘comfort food’ for them, fed to them as a child and at school. I had them at school and ate them because I was hungry. Fortunately, we lived around the world, so they never appeared at home.

But I’m not sure that it is fair to blame us Brits, since Heinz, who first inflicted them on us, was an American company and presumably brought them over from America — along with tomato ketchup and the dreaded tinned "spaghetti in tomato sauce”. The only beans I remember in England from my childhood, apart from “Has Beans” are butter beans, which were just boiled and drained — no tomato sauce — and any cold left over butter beans were fried up next morning with the bacon. They were good!

Mr X

and then reiterated:

Point take, Master Mark.

Hmm… Heinz… Let’s call that retribution.

The thing is, those particular nasties are not to be found over here. I think they are UK market exports.

As to the rest of the offensive US manufactured foods mentioned, canned pasta is a relic of the '60s and '70s. I know they are still on the store shelves but I haven’t seen a can of that stuff in several decades. Tomato ketchup, not a fan. I prefer brown sauce or malt vinegar. Everything’s better with brown sauce.

Butter beans: fry up 4-5 strips of bacon crisp. Set aside to drain. Crumble to “bit sized”. Drain grease from pan. Add a couple tbs butter to pan and melt. add butter bean. Lightly sprinkle with salt and pepper. Cook covered for a bit. Add on tsp crushed red pepper. Cook a bit. Add bacon bits and stir. Spoon into bowl and top with pulled pork, shredded beef, or roasted chicken.

Living here is not helping my diet.

Did you know that the scientific name for beans is Phaseolus vulgaris? :laughing:

Well, this sure went off topic quickly. :slight_smile:

Regarding the compiler, the next major version of Scrivener for Windows will contain a lot of improvements in that regard, but I don’t think the compiler is ever going to be something that can be easy if you want to use it to accomplish specific types of formatting. Although, I will say that if you find the compiler difficult to use, or if it’s getting in your way, simply choose to Format As “Original”, export to a word processor, and do your final formatting there. This will take all of your work out with empty lines between each document, without overriding the format in any way.

Regarding the criticism of Compile not being WYSIWYG, I’m not really sure how that could ever be possible, given that the purpose of Compile is to export to different programs, so Scrivener cannot possibly show you exactly how the compile document will look in all of those programs (it couldn’t show you how it would look as an e-book, for instance, without having its own e-book viewer coded from scratch). And even to show you how the general text looks would would require constantly compiling in the background with every change you make to the options.

The complexity of Compile is, unfortunately, the pay-off for the flexibility of the rest of Scrivener. Scrivener allows you to structure your work however you want. This means that, if it is to allow you complete control over the formatting and layout at the export/print stage, it needs to provide enough controls so that the user can set everything up to match his or her own particular way of structuring along with his or her own formatting requirements. If Scrivener just forced you into working in chapters and scenes, Compile could be a whole lot simpler.

We will continue to think about and do our best to improve Compile, but honestly, I’ve put a lot of thought into it over the years, and I have yet to come up with a solution that is going to be “straightforward” for everyone that doesn’t involve crippling the functionality and just telling users to do the final layout and formatting in another program (which you can already do anyway). As I say, the Windows version’s Compile panel will be massively overhauled with the next major version to be more like the Mac version’s, but Compile is the main part of the program that causes confusion on the Mac, too. I think what we perhaps need to do is just make it clearer that you don’t need to use all the options in Compile and can just send your work out for formatting elsewhere if that’s what you want.

Personally, I think it’s ageist to assign some sort of weighted importance to the first post in a thread. Statistically speaking this is a cooking thread now (in particular, focused on the regional differences in bean-based cuisine).

Now if we can go back to the real question:
Was Jaysen’s post sufficiently limiting in the invitation, or has he just made a general offer to feed the entirety of the population within an hour (transportation method not specified) of Savannah (A) for free, and (B) including delivery?

And we’ve given you ample opportunities (and reasons) to limit some of us only posting in certain areas. But are all “fair” and “inclusive” so …

:stuck_out_tongue:

Allow me to provide some qualification then: If anyone from the forum finds themselves within 40mi of Savannah, GA, USA or within 40mi of Beaufort, SC USA, I will deliver ample beans to their location. I do require sufficient notice for the preparation of said qty of bean (12hr would be ideal!). Cost to the recipient will be putting up with me.

Some might suggest that is a high price to pay for a pot of beans.

I’ve been playing with Scrivener’s viscera more than I’ve been writing with it, but it’s been worth the price of admission. More than worth it. And when I finally get around to writing with Scrivener, instead of writing little scripts for Scrivener, it’s really going to be a gold mine.

Scrivener flies into the wind and breaks new ground, and with humble deference to the true topic of this thread, it never gets that backward.

But there are a few things I need to sort out, probably with a re-read of the documentation.

A new document begins with the default formatting, but that doesn’t seem to include paragraph spacing. Or maybe it does - but tools->options->editor doesn’t mention paragraph spacing. I’m not sure how to get paragraph spacing to ‘stick’ in defaults.

I can include paragraph spacing when I set or override a preset - I believe that’s what the ‘save all formatting’ option does. However, I don’t see a way to make a preset the default for new documents, and that seems to be the only way to control paragraph spacing.

As to the complexity of compile, I’d say it’s pretty simple compared to full desktop publishing. It’s crazy how complicated the world makes the seemingly simple notion of putting words on paper.

Er, never mind. I found the paragraph spacing in the editor defaults.

Yep, it’s there. Hopefully finding that last missing piece wasn’t like listing the nine billionth name of God. That would be disquieting. Huh, wonder why it’s getting so dark?

I think it’s unfortunate that the OP’s question about using Scrivener’s compile feature ended up buried in a deluge of off-topic posts about baked beans and the like. I’m having a similar problem, and have spent the better part of an hour so far googling and looking through the documentation to resolve it with no success. I could really have benefited from a single on-topic response (or even a link to one in the Tech Support forum) that addressed his actual issue.

I’ve posted my particular question to the Tech Support forum here. If anyone can help, I would greatly appreciate it.

Really? Since the OP was using the Feedback forum, I think he was making a statement (a rant, really), not a question. In fact, he was making a suggestion about how to structure the documentation based on his personal experience (the OP’s author apparently works writing tech docs).

Anyway, he was kindly invited to provide more info about his problem in order to get help, but he didn’t, which sort of proves the point.