Importing an already completed or nearly completed work - a series of questions:

Importing an already completed or nearly completed work:
Can it be done?
Is it easy or challenging? I tend to save as rtf with lots of endnotes. Non-fiction and endnotes are extra information, cites, tangents, etc. I might as well call them “exiles” rather than endnotes, but I don’t want to have to manually copy/program each one.
Is it worth it?
Why?
$50 isn’t that steep if it can convert to assist with publishing/breaking up the work into chapters/sections, and works well for rewriting/revisions - which is the next step of course.

Well first of all it sounds like you may not have downloaded the free demo. You can test all of the various questions you may have directly, with that, for up to 30 days before making a final decision.

To answer your basic question though: yes, so long as we’re talking about actual endnotes in your word processor, where you can click on a number and it takes you to the note, then you’ll be fine. If they are just text typed into the very end of the document, then you would need to add them in by hand—but if you’re working that way in a word processor you could continue working that way in Scrivener as well. It doesn’t require any special technology to do that—but has downsides like having to manage anchor numbers manually.

Scrivener’s native format is RTF by the way, so you’re all good on that score.

I did download it, but I’ll start the trial when I have more time to mess with tech. You know how that stuff eats time. I’m still hot and heavy in the madman phase of drafting. The only inherent programming in my rtf are the endnotes, so that is a big technical question for this book if importing (on the suggestion of a couple fiction author friends.)
I don’t tech update much. I’d still be drafting in the DOS based Enable word processor if not for juicy new features like spell check and endnotes.
So it’ll work. But is the experience worth it for the other capabilities importing might allow? I’ll be reviewing the tutorials and the like for my self, (reviews as well) but I value personal assessments highly. Word of mouth really is the best source. It’s one thing to have a capability, it’s another to have experience utilizing it.

I did download it, but I’ll start the trial when I have more time to mess with tech. You know how that stuff eats time. I’m still hot and heavy in the madman phase of drafting.

Understood! Though to balance that out, it’s worth knowing that Scrivener’s design focus is on the drafting phase itself—it starts to taper off once you get into working with an editor and getting things finished off. So depending on your preferences, it may be the sort of thing you check out once you’re ready to start the next project. Or throw routine to the wind and dive in sooner than later to see whether or not it looks worth the effort of switching technology mid-writing phase.

But is the experience worth it for the other capabilities importing might allow?

It depends a lot on personal preference. For some people, the way Scrivener works is transformative to the drafting phase and they never look back to working in long text files. Others are fine with how they’ve always worked and the various things Scrivener provides for a “non-linear” kind of writing experience just aren’t their cup of tea.