Is there anything in Scrivener I can measure the time of spoken text with?

Is there anything in Scrivener I can measure the time of spoken text with? Not only for dialogues but also for a speech and such?

Or is there a program or else for Windows that could do it (no online program)?

Would the Reading Time in Project Statistics work, or are you looking for something else? I am pretty sure that is the closest thing to that you’re going to get in Scrivener.

Would the Reading Time in Project Statistics work, or are you looking for something else?

Yes, actually the speaking time. And for special documents / one document only.

I am pretty sure that is the closest thing to that you’re going to get in Scrivener.

Yes, me too, but I am afraid the reading time is very different to the reading time.

Maybe you mean different to the actual reading time?

I don’t have Scrivener for Windows myself, so I’m guessing a little bit here, but it occurs to me that you could do a test with at least a small portion of your writing and compare it to the Reading Time in Project Statistics.
If the Reading Time feature is only for a project as a whole, you could create a temporary project and copy paste the test text into it, then do a test read and compare it to the projected reading time. Maybe more than two or three test reads, to get a good comparison rate to work with.

If it’s a speech with a limited time to deliver, keep in mind that nervousness/“atmosphere” etc. can make the speech go considerably faster or slower in the actual delivery. Maybe, in such a case, at least 2-3 timed reads of the whole thing spaced out from each other before you have to deliver it.

When it comes to speeches…

I spent many years doing English language commentary for videos where I had to match the time to the original Chinese commentary. To begin with I laboriously counted syllables in both texts —easy in Chinese as 1 character = 1 syllable!—but as I got more experience, I found that, as a rule of thumb, if I printed in 12pt Times New Roman on A4 with 2.5 cm. margins, each line would take 5–6* seconds. § I would get the people who were producing the video to tell me how long each paragraph of Chinese took to speak and so could edit the English to match closely. By the way, British English, but I doubt that makes any difference.

So, for a reading time for a speech, you could use that rule of thumb. As for dialogue, for the purpose, you could copy it and paste it into WP pages with those dimensions and use the same rule of thumb.

HTH

Mark

  • Normally 6 seconds, but if there were figures in the line, they are more condensed, so 5 seconds for a line with a line with a figure; 1,234 is 4 glyphs but 10 syllables … about 1.5 seconds to say at “delivery speed”.

§ If you use US Letter rather than A4, it is very slightly wider, so over a long text, it might increase the length slightly

I used the old-fashioned 2 to 2.5 wps for voice overs, but it depends on who is reading for what purporse.

OK, thank you very much!

Yes, wordchiseler, there must be a way to use the reading time feature. I will try that out, will try to find a “unit of measurement” to use it as a speaking time function.

So, for a reading time for a speech, you could use that rule of thumb. As for dialogue, for the purpose, you could copy it and paste it into WP pages with those dimensions and use the same rule of thumb.

I will try out as well, thank you. What does WP / wps mean?

WPS = words per second

WP = word processor (I think, but maybe WordPerfect?) :innocent:

I used WP for word processor. I never used any measure of “words per second” as word length varies a lot and is not very useful when the text has a lot if figures, 6 syllables per second is about normal, but counting syllables is tedious in extreme.

:slight_smile:

Mark

Thank you, Jim. Well, or WordPress.

I am wondering if there is a statistic for syllables somewhere. Respectively why there isn’t one in Scrivener (may be because anyone needs it). Or may be in another WProcessor.

https://syllablecounter.net/ ???

Many thanks for the link!

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