Keith, is there something you want to tell us?

theguardian.com/us-news/201 … weet-uk-us
(it’s in the fourth paragraph)

phil

If it wasn’t so scary it would be funny. Not the KB part (someone loving Scriv so much the legally change their name is pretty dang cool) but the dingbat in chief part. And I’m not a left, center left, left of center, center, right of center, center right or even right winger. I’m more a “who the hell voted for these morons” type.

Anyway… I know return you to a less angst filled thread about stupid americans.

:cry:

Hope this helps:
theguardian.com/politics/20 … ter-tirade

I’m still trying to work out how to spin some positive publicity from the word “Scrivener” being mentioned between the names Theresa May and Donald Trump… Answers on a postcard? (As someone observed on The Last Leg tonight, I love how Theresa May is so popular that Trump thought she must be the one with six followers.)

Surely mrs Scrivener should have a free copy of Scrivener, so she can write down her experiences? :smiley:

the KB part (someone loving Scriv so much the legally change their name is pretty dang cool) but the dingbat in chief part. And I’m not a left, center left, left of center, center, right of center, center right or even right winger. I’m more a “who the hell voted for these morons” type. :wink:

Not sure if you were joking, but it is not an uncommon surname in the UK. A quick internet search reveals well over 2,000 people with the surname in the UK – and that will not be all of them, of course, only what the internet turns up. So I don’t think Mrs Scrivener was making an act of homage – more likely that she married a man who is descended from someone who earned his living as a clerk or scribe in the Middle Ages. :smiley:

Yes, I’ve known of fellow Brits called Scrivener (or Scriven, which is presumably a derivative). I even knew of a journalist called Peter Scrivener, and if that’s not an example of nominative determinism, I don’t know what is!