linking both editors together (scrollbar wise)?

Hi,

I’ve just bumped into something and wondered if Scrivener has a solution for it.

I have several documents and have now decided to translate them. For this, I created a new document for every original document.

So far so good.

I then start typing in the new document, translating as I go, having both documents side by side.

And then! Every time I reach the end of the screen in the original document, I have to go to that editor, scroll down, go back to the other editor and continue.

Anyone have a better idea for this?
Can I ‘link’ the two scroll-bars together so the scroll simultaneously?
(which sounded so cool when I thought of it, but after a night of sleep, don’t know if that could work with the documents having different lengths and all…)

Any other software recommended for this task?

Thanks for any suggestions!

Tanja

Hi Tannie,

You don’t say what sort of Mac you’re using, but if you’re on a MacBook of some flavour and running Leopard, you can use the two finger scroll to scroll the non-active pane … you just have to have the mouse-pointer over it. No need to change focus.

Someone using a desktop and a mouse might be able to tell you how to do the same with that kind of set-up.

HTH :slight_smile:

Mark

It’s exactly the same, but you need a scroll wheel on your mouse :slight_smile:

Thanks for the tips!

Unfortunately (well, only a little), I have my trusty iBook G4 which doesn’t do fancy stuff like two finger scrolls (that I know of). I will keep these in mind though. Thanks!

Tanja

Tanja, what about a mouse with a scroll-wheel? Have you tried … though it might depend on your version of OS-X.

I’ll stick my neck out and say that my guess is that Keith wouldn’t run with the idea of synchronised scrolling. My suspicion is that the programming implications would be heavy, and given that, inevitably, more and more people will be moving onto intel macs and running 10.4 or above, it would be complexity that will become less and less useful. There … let’s watch Keith shoot me down!

:slight_smile:

Mark

Tanja, what about a mouse with a scroll-wheel? Have you tried … though it might depend on your version of OS-X.

I’ll stick my neck out and say that my guess is that Keith wouldn’t run with the idea of synchronised scrolling. My suspicion is that the programming implications would be heavy … what about when the second pane has the corkboard, or outline view, or an image? Would you want them to scroll? How would Scrivener know not to? And given that, inevitably, more and more people will be moving onto intel macs and running 10.4 or above, it would be complexity that will become less and less useful. There … let’s watch Keith shoot me down!

:slight_smile:

Mark

Yeah, synchronised scrolling wouldn’t really be possible… As Tanja herself notes, given that each document would not correspond to one another in terms of paragraph length/overall text length, and add to that the fact that editing would change that again, it would be a nightmarish mess, to say the least. The scroll wheel/two fingered scroll solution is ideal for this; it’s just a shame that the old iBook didn’t support such things.

However, there is a hack out there that is easy to install on an iBook to get the two fingered scroll working on even the older models that didn’t support it officially - I used it on my own old iBook and it worked fine:

iscroll2.sourceforge.net/

All the best,
Keith

This is driving me nuts. Did there not used to be a keyboard shortcut to page up/down the opposing split without changing focus? I know there is the history functions for the opposing split.

No, but we discussed it. I actually looked into it at the time but found that it required internal methods that weren’t easy to implement, if I remember, but looking at it again now I’m not sure why I came to that conclusion… As really, it is pretty easy to implement, and I’ve just done it. So, in the next update, in the Editor > Alternate Editor submenu, there are now “Scroll Up” and “Scroll Down” commands, which can be accessed using the keyboard shortcuts opt-cmd-up and opt-cmd-down (the former zoom in and out keyboard shortcuts - zoom in and zoom out is now done using cmd-> and comd-<, to match Pages). It works very nicely, too, so this should help in the future…
All the best,
Keith

Ah great, this will help a lot! Thanks for checking it out and finding a solution :smiley:

Just a little note though, it may be my system (ibook g4, running 10.5.4) but when I press opt-com-down my window minimizes (same as com-M does). It does this in all my programs and remapping it for Scrivener in the System Preferences -> keyboard shortcuts didn’t help. I’ve remapped it to ctrl-com-down and it now works (the Zoom Out bit, that is.)

Does anyone else have this?

Tanja

I have not yet tried because I couldn’t find the mouse I thought I had, hehe (might be time for some serious dejunking here).
Should I find it, I will try and I think that will work but it’s been a while since I worked with a mouse. Using a mouse with my iBook will create somewhat of a challenge. See, I’m one of those crazy people that uses her laptop on her lap (yes, really!). Can’t remember the last time I put it on a table or a desk to work with…

Now, if only I could find that mouse…

Tanja

Curious about opt-cmd-down arrow on your machine… I don’t think that’s a standard shortcut, though. Where is it set in your system preferences? Under “All Applications” (mine is empty there) or elsewhere?
Best,
Keith

Bah, I typed an answer and the internet ate it.

To repeat myself: I installed the application ‘Witch’ a while back and that also had the option to set a shortcut key for ‘Minimize front window’ (set to opt-cmd-down arrow in my case, don’t know if that’s the default). I had disabled the application (it’s a preference pane in System Preferences) but the shortcut key apperantly still worked. I have cleared the box and everything works again as it should.

Tanja