Moving files out of the Scrivener binder into a new project

I have a lot of files in the “research” and other sections that are not part of the final manuscript. I want to move these out of the current binder, e.g. “cut and paste” and not “Copy and paste”, into another new project.

I have looked and looked, and I see no way to do this. Is there a way to do this that is not too complicated?

Thanks in advance.

The software is designed in a way that prevents accidental deletion of documents.
You can’t just delete one or cut it out of the binder.

To copy a document to another project, you can open both projects, then drag and drop from one’s binder to the other.
That’ll make a copy in the destination project.

After which you’ll have to send the document to the trash in the source project, and, ultimately, after making sure you want to get rid of whatever is in the trash, empty it.

Note, however, that you can Compile whichever files you want into your final manuscript. That is, there’s no reason other than your own convenience why you would need to remove these files.

And stuff in the Research folder doesn’t compile anyway.

1 Like

Beyond the advice given above, I would suggest looking at §5.3.2, Splitting & Merging Projects, in the user manual PDF. The second method that is described in the section on splitting projects is going to be the most effective if you make use of metadata, links between things, have a highly customised project setup and so forth. Dragging items into a new empty project will copy some metadata, but it is mainly just going to be copying the items themselves.

I would also second the notion that there is rarely a reason to actually do this. The main one I can think of is if what you’re working on becomes a series, and you want multiple projects to all share the same research project. That’s not a bad way of working, but it’s worth noting a lot of people keep multiple books of a series in the same project so as to keep all aspects of the work close at hand.

1 Like

… but it’s worth noting a lot of people keep multiple books of a series in the same project so as to keep all aspects of the work close at hand.

Like this observation!

I keep an annual “Notetaker” project, and another annual project for a major client. Sometimes an article or a particular set of notes will remain relevant across the New Year boundary, so I’ll use drag and drop to move files from “this year” to “next year” as needed.