Opened v2 project in v3...why so many "Recovered Files"?

I’m working on migrating from Scrivener v2 to v3. When I open my main project, a novel I’ve been working on for a few years, in v3, I get 36 “Recovered Files,” with dates ranging all the way back to October 8, 2016.

Is this normal for the upgrading of a v2 project to v3 to result in so many “orphaned” documents?

I don’t have a problem with going through every single one to check to see what it is, and whether I want to save/use the text. I’m just wondering if my project is corrupted or something.

Any migration advice welcome!

The most common cause of “orphaned” documents in Scrivener 2 was synchronization conflicts: for whatever reason, Dropbox (or another service) was unable to decide which of two versions of a document to use, and kept both. However, since Dropbox didn’t update the master index file that Scrivener uses to build the Binder, such “conflict” documents were invisible to Scrivener and were “lost” for all intents and purposes.

(This was therefore a major cause of “lost work” issues.)

Scrivener 3 has a more robust mechanism for handling this kind of conflict, and as part of the upgrade process it “walks” through the project looking for files with no corresponding Binder entry and “recovers” them.

If you haven’t noticed missing material before now, most of the recovered files are probably older versions that you can safely discard.

Proliferation of “recovered” files is often a sign that you might need to look at your synchronization habits. See this article for best practices: scrivener.tenderapp.com/help/kb … c-services

Katherine

Thanks, Katherine.

If you haven’t noticed missing material before now, most of the recovered files are probably older versions that you can safely discard.

That’s the case, yes. Most are long-ago penned passages I recognize that can be safely deleted. Some, however, are alternate drafts of passages, and those will have to be studied and perhaps pilferred.

Appreciate the head’s up on sync habits. I’ve masted them pretty well, I think. And the dates of these orphans are testament to that: most are 2016 and 2017. They fall off in 2018, and there are virtually none this year. Probably a good sign. Dropbox takes a certain amount of time to sync. You can’t just close the iPad up because Scrivener says it’s done syncing. You then need to wait a bit to allow Dropbox to finish up (in the background).