Opening Mac Scrivener project (v1.54)

Hello,
I wanted to report successfully running Scrivener .23 beta for linux on Mint Linux XFCE (which is now on a rolling-Debian base rather than Ubuntu, in case that matters). However, while I can open a new project and type stuff, I was hoping to experiment with editing some projects I’ve already produced on my Mac version of Scrivener, v.1.54. I can’t seem to open these. I read that I needed to open the .scriv folders and look for a project file post-scripted .scrivx. Unfortunately my Mac project doesn’t seem to offer that. When I open the .scriv folder I am confronted by two folders: one headed _MACOSX the other with the same title as the folder I just opened. Neither contains a .scrivx file.

Does anyone know what I am doing wrong?
One hypothesis is that when I zip up the scrivener file for copying across to the other computer the relevant file is not being included. But why would that be? Some sort of permissions issue?

Any help or suggestions gratefully received.
All the best,
Ian

Windows Scrivener is only compatible with Mac projects updated to the 2.0 version. You have to open your 1.x projects in Scriv 2.0 first, and then use the updated project in Windows scrivener.

Thanks, Robert, for the quick response. That would explain it then.

Hmm. Perhaps it is time to upgrade. I’ve been so happy with the earlier version I haven’t seen a great deal of need to try 2.0 yet–plus I’ve been using Linux a lot more than Mac recently, returning to Mac largely just to run scrivener. What are the most compelling changes in the new version?
All the best,
Ian

2.0 took me two years, so there are a lot. :slight_smile: Here are a few:

literatureandlatte.com/scriv … p?show=new

Regarding the file format, one of the main reasons that the file format was redesigned for 2.0 was so that it would be Windows-compatible. The 1.x format used a lot of Mac-only file formats, such as .plists and RTFD files. The 2.0 format uses XML and RTF, which are platform-agnostic.

All the best,
Keith

Hm. Now I’m embarrassed I asked. :blush: I forgot that you might be reading this, Keith. I did sort of know there must be a page there somewhere on the website listing all the changes, and thanks to your posting it I have now read it. So thanks! :slight_smile: (Though I haven’t time to watch all the videos just now, I’ll try to do so at some point; several of the changes mentioned have piqued my interest.)

The reason I asked, wasn’t because I doubted that you’ve used your time well. I was just curious as to what other users thought were their favourite and best used/loved features of the new version; and this partly because I know that with my current project workload, I wouldn’t have time to spend exploring and discovering all the whizzy new features and it is of interest to hear what your users think the killer new bits are. (I.e. so that I can investigate those first.)

Not having upgraded yet is (believe it or not) a compliment of sorts to you, in that what I use at present is so helpful to me, I don’t actually feel as though I’m missing crucial features. It may also be a compliment to you that Scrivener is about the only paid for application I still use, since I switched to Linux. It is a very well-designed piece of software and worth every penny. (Other factors slowing my upgrade are being basically insolvent at present, and not wishing to give any more time to my computer than I already give it! It leads to a feeling of ‘if I’m going to have to spend time relearning how to do things, perhaps I’ll just keep doing things the way I already do’.)

So if someone recommends me two or three of the best new bits that an academic writer might be likely to fall in love with, I’m more likely to turn my attention to them first.

Lastly, can I say how impressed I am that you are actually making the program available to Linux users. I realise we are partly just piggy-backing on the hard work being done to make a Windows version available, but it is still very much appreciated. Out of interest do I need to buy two separate licenses to use the Linux and the Mac version? (I would expect to just use the Linux version if it were equal to the Mac version, but my understanding is that that may be some time away.)

Anyway, thanks again for a great piece of software that has greatly improved my writing in recent years.

All the best,
Ian

Hi Ian,

No need to feel embarrassed! I understand completely, and appreciate the kind words. Regarding paying twice, to be honest I think the Linux version is going to remain in the “free beta” stage for quite a while to come, long after the Windows version is put on sale. Although the work that goes into the Windows version all automatically feeds into the Linux version too, and will continue to do so, we feel that we can’t start charging for the Linux version until such time as we can put added work into that to make it equal to the other versions. I believe there are a few elements of the Windows version that just don’t translate into the Linux version, such as the PDF view - I think that doesn’t work at all on the Linux version, unless I am out of date on that. So although we’ll continue to provide Linux builds, it might be some time before there is an official “for sale” Linux version that fixes all the very specific Linux bugs and things that don’t work.

The Windows version will require a separate licence to the Mac version, though, because they are separate development efforts, so eventually the Linux version will be too, I’m afraid.

I hope that makes sense!

All the best,
Keith

Actually, if you use wine and the windows version, PDFs work fine. (think it was darkhorse who figured out that the dotnet package will make pdf viewing work.)

That’s OK. KB can hang out in our clubhouse. OSX is similar to linux. :mrgreen: