Problems Creating New Folders & Nesting

This is a silly problem, I guess, but it’s something that continually irks me. I use Folders for chapters, and each folder (of course) has a number of Documents within it. I only use one level, so basically the structure is like this:

Manuscript
–Title Page (Text Document)
----Folder
------Text Documents
----Folder
------Text Documents
----Folder
------Text Documents
…Etc.

My problem is that when I create a new folder by a) converting a text document to a folder, and then attempting to b) hoist or upgrade the new folder’s status in the Binder “outline” it automatically jumps to the bottom of the current folder. I think I understand the logic of this behavior, but I am not clear on the best way to nest a folder under existing ones, while maintaining its position in the structure. I hope I’m communicating this correctly. Basically, referring back to the example structure above, I would like to be able to take a text document under Folder 2, Convert it to a Folder, then, using Ctrl+Cmd+Left Arrow, upgrade the folder so it is on the same level as all the others. Sounds like it ought to be simple, but I have problems with the automatic positioning the Scrivener then imposes.

Hi,

I’m not quite sure I understand you, because from how you describe it, things should be happening as you want. Take this structure:

Draft
-- Folder 1
---- Text Doc 1
-- Folder 2
---- Text Doc 2
-- Folder 3
---- Text Doc 3

Now, suppose you convert Text Doc 2 to a folder and hit ctrl-cmd-left arrow with it selected, you should end up with this:

-- Folder 1
---- Text Doc 1
-- Folder 2
-- Text Doc 2 [now a folder]
-- Folder 3
---- Text Doc 3

Are you saying that you are seeing different behaviour?

All the best,
Keith

I think what you’re seeing is this:

Draft
-- Folder 1
---- Text Doc 1
-- Folder 2
---- Text Doc 2
-- Folder 3
---- Text Doc 3
---- Text Doc 4
---- Text Doc 5

You convert Text Doc 4 to a folder, and then CMD-CTRL-Left arrow, and you get this:

Draft
-- Folder 1
---- Text Doc 1
-- Folder 2
---- Text Doc 2
-- Folder 3
---- Text Doc 3
---- Text Doc 5
-- Text Doc 4 (now a folder)

Is that it? A folder can’t be at the same level as another folder and remain “in” that folder, so it has to go after that folder. For that matter, nothing in the binder can be simultaneously a child of and at the same level as (i.e. a sibling of) another object in the binder.

Robert Guthrie,

Yes, that is exactly what I am seeing, except that there are many more text documents in the way, and the folder ends up at the bottom of a large container.

Neil

Hi, All,
I think I have a variation of Neil’s problem–and it’s hard to describe distinctively enough to search the forum or the manual.

I find myself looking for an option in preferences or for a command somewhere that goes something like “in the binder, insert a new item directly under the selected item.” So if I hit an “add new document” to a selected folder, I’d like to see the new document go directly under the folder that I have selected rather than pop down to being the last item of the selected folder (which might have a bevy of other folders between).

Generally, I go about using the binder as an outline and put my main headings (Introduction, Middle1, Middle 2, Middle3, Conclusion") in first as folders. When I think of a better way to say what I want, I want to put that text document as the first one in its respective folder, knowing that the older folders below will eventually be raided and then ditched. Is this a “wrong” approach in some sense, or distinction between fiction and non-fiction? Was Scrivener designed so that an initial set of text items would be in a “flat file” as a first draft, and then chapters and sections would be put into place? I do find that the flying “untitled” documents disruptive. If this is the way that Scrivener was designed to work, perhaps a bit of direction on a workflow or methodology is what is needed rather than a switch.

I’d appreciate any light shed on this issue. thanks!

Olonoff, it sounds like you want (in Robert’s example for instance) text document 4 to become a folder that contains text document 5. In which case, do the following.

  1. Convert to folder (this can be done at any point and it won’t affect the outcome; text documents can equally contain other text documents)
  2. Select all the text documents below it (5 through to n in the example below) and drag them into the newly created folder (which should still be a child of folder 3 for the time being).
  3. cmd+ctrl+left arrow. This should now give you this structure.

Draft -- Folder 1 ---- Text Doc 1 -- Folder 2 ---- Text Doc 2 -- Folder 3 ---- Text Doc 3 -- Text Doc 4 [now a folder] ---- Text Doc 5 [...] ---- Text Doc n

thanks. Unfortunately, in order to nest “all content beneath” into a folder, you have to first make sure that all the content actually BELONGS in that folder. that’s not always the case, but I’m learning to adjust to that.

If you want the documents “below” your new folder to become children of your new folder, then you have to first select those documents and move them to the “right” (in my example, that would be Text Doc 5). Then select the new folder (Text Doc 4) and move it left.

    Draft
    -- Folder 1
    ---- Text Doc 1
    -- Folder 2
    ---- Text Doc 2
    -- Folder 3
    ---- Text Doc 3
    ---- Text Doc 4
    ------ Text Doc 5 <- indent it, making it a child of the document above it
    Draft
    -- Folder 1
    ---- Text Doc 1
    -- Folder 2
    ---- Text Doc 2
    -- Folder 3
    ---- Text Doc 3
    -- Text Doc 4 <-move to the left, taking it's adopted "child" documents with it
    ---- Text Doc 5 

Aside: Note that the only real differences between folders and documents in Scrivener are the icon and how they can be treated distinctly by the compile process. A document can be a parent of another file or set of files, just like a folder.

Guthrie -

Thanks very much. It’s all very logical. Unfortunately, that’s not always the way my mind works!

Regards,

Neil