Project Bookmarks and Document Bookmarks

I wish to propose that Project Bookmarks and Document Bookmarks be allocated an icon on the same level as Synopsis, Bookmarks, Custom Metadata, Snapshots and Comments & Footnotes.
Right now, if I want to switch between the two, I need to click on a dropdown, which tends to break my concentration of wanting to access something with one click.
For example, I have my lists of characters, places, general research topics, regular expressions, slang and structuring under (linked at) Project Bookmarks, while research on an event, a type of weapon, etc. relevant to a specific scene is at Document Bookmark level.
It would be easier to click back and forth on icons alongside one another (as small as the difference of clicking between a dropdown might be), and there is certainly sufficient space in the Inspector to facilitate this.
All in all, my view is that it would be a more immediate experience, therefore more user-friendly.

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What about the shortcut to toggle between the two… Cmd-6? Even less intrusive than using the mouse.

:smile:

Mark

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or Ctrl + 6 in windows or edit the keyboard commands to something more convienent for you. I have extra function keys and reprogrammed to one of those if use alot.

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Very handy to know, thank you. But why “hide” something that should be intuitive.
I have the unfortunate experience of following a Scrivener Facebook User Group (not affiliated to L&L), and it’s this type of thing that stumps new users out of the gate. I doubt the majority know the value of bookmarks.
It’s certainly the greatest thing since brown bread for me to get around at the click of a button from a central repository.
I don’t know, but to my mind, my proposed change would be easy to implement and of value because what is not “seen” tends to be overlooked, irrespective of the availability of a user-manual, videos and whatever other commentary is out there for users.

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True. When I get a new piece of software, the first thing I do is spend a bit of time going through all the menus and submenus and the interface elements and then the preferences, setting any that I know I’ll want set some way. That way I get a good idea of all that the software offers, even though I end up using only a proportion of its facilities.

Mind you, having used Scrivener since the launch of V. 1 for Mac in early 2007, when there wasn’t a manual or any videos or books on it, exploring the interface and learning as I used it was the only way.

:smile:

Mark

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