Scrivener 2.8.1 crashes

Scrivener crashes when I switch to full screen while “Split Vertically” is on. Need help.

Have you checked to see if all projects crash this way? I ask because I’m having no troubles over here in 10.12.2 using the following steps:

  1. Created a new blank test project.
  2. Pressed the Shift-Cmd-’ shortcut to split vertically.
  3. Pressed Ctrl-Cmd-F to transition to Full Screen mode.

I’ve been experiencing similar crashes. It just started this week. It happens on both my desktop and my laptop running macOS 10.12.3, which I just updated to this week. My crashes occur when leaving full-screen composition mode and going to another document. Sometimes it crashes as soon as I select the other document, once it crashed when selecting text in a new document.

The problem is that it’s not consistent. I can’t make it happen just by entering and leaving composition mode, which makes it hard to test.

I’ve submitted two or three crash reports, but the crashes are pretty frustrating. They always seem to happen after writing a lot, so I’ve gotten into the habit of saving before exiting full-screen mode to avoid losing any more work.

Saving?
Just stop writing for a few seconds and Scrivener automatically saves your work. Didn’t you know that this is an automatic feature?

I would suggest leaving Console.app open in the background for a while, and enabling internal error alerts in Scrivener’s General preference pane (at the very bottom). It could be something is going awry earlier, but is largely asymptomatic until getting to a point where you crash. An alert will give you advance warning and a chance to gracefully quit, while also potentially providing more information as to what is going on.

Yes, I know that’s a feature, but because I store my projects on a Dropbox drive (for sharing with the mobile app), I have it set to 60 seconds. A lot can happen in 60 seconds.

I’ll try that. Thanks.

??? :open_mouth:

Dropbox is not a drive, it’s a folder on your Mac, like any other folder. So there’s no need to have longer time settings. The only thing that is changed and saved when you take a few seconds break is the specific sub-document you are writing in. And the dropbox app is very economic on resources when it syncs the changed file to the dropbox server in the background, while you continue writing.

Dropbox is not a drive, it’s a folder on your Mac, like any other folder. So there’s no need to have longer time settings. The only thing that is changed and saved when you take a few seconds break is the specific sub-document you are writing in. And the dropbox app is very economic on resources when it syncs the changed file to the dropbox server in the background, while you continue writing.
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I understand what Dropbox is and how it works. Regardless of how efficient it is, frequent saving generates needless network traffic.

And the point of this thread is about a crash problem in Scrivener, not to debate autosave settings and dropbox.

Especially since that’s 60 seconds of idle time. If you’re writing continuously, you might not be idle for a full minute for several hours. I’d definitely recommend a shorter interval. I use 10 seconds on my own system, and haven’t run into any performance or synchronization issues.

I also have the old Word paranoia habit of manually saving every page or so. Probably not necessary with Scrivener, but certainly won’t hurt.

Katherine

If you manually save very often, what about the backups? You have an enormous amount of backups as well then? Indefinite number?

I just got another crash. The only thing interesting from the Console app:

default 15:36:50.138135 -0500 Scrivener NSSoftLinking - The ShareKit framework’s library couldn’t be loaded from /System/Library/PrivateFrameworks/ShareKit.framework/Versions/A/ShareKit.

This was right when it crashed (repeated five times), though I noticed the same message a few times earlier without a crash.

Submitted the crash log again.

Hi, Mark,

Hope the crash problem gets tracked down soon. In the meantime, to minimize frustration and work loss, I think Katherine’s point is well taken.

Best,
gr