Somehow an entire document was converted into Scene Heading format. How can I convert the text back with correct capitalization (so in correct spelling)?

Somehow an entire document was converted into Scene Heading format. How can I convert the text back with correct capitalization (so in correct spelling)?

Hi Martyy. From the looks of that screenshot, I think you’ve activated script mode for that document. It can be toggled using Ctrl+8 or the Format > Scriptwriting > Script Mode - Screenplay command.

If that document’s icon in the binder is now yellow, then it’s in scriptwriting mode. Toggling that command back to general text should return the icon to a white page and general text.

Hello RuthS!

Yes, it is / was activated, because I tried to write a screenplay with Scrivener absolutely unsuccessfully. OK, yes, thank you, it already is turned off, but how could I get the correct large and lower case?

OK, but unfortunately it doesn’t return the correct spelling.

Can you upload an image showing what you’re seeing?

Your trust level should now be high enough that you can post a screenshot.

Sorry, an image of what? To clarify what?

I guess, such a trust level is not present at all.

Hi Martyy. When you say that you’re not able to get the text’s capitalization converted correctly, I’m trying and failing to picture what the main editor in your Scrivener project looks like at present.

Seeing a screenshot of what you’re seeing on the screen could be helpful in figuring out what steps to suggest to correct the issue.

On my PC, I use either Win+Shift+S or the PrtScr keyboard command to capture a screenshot of the full screen with the built-in Snipping tool.

The Snipping Tool should save that screenshot, and you can click on the Notifications panel to save it to your PC’s Desktop. From there, you can start a new comment in this thread and then click on the icon with the upward-pointing arrow to upload your screenshot.

If you’re not familiar with using your PC’s Snipping Tool for taking screenshots, this Microsoft Support page has instructions for both Windows 11 and Windows 10.

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Hello RuthS!

OK, yes, of course, actually I would think I would use the editor in a very common way:

Many thanks also for the instructions and the link!

Hi Martyy. Thank you for that screenshot.

When you’re typing in this document, what is Scrivener doing with the capitalization that’s affecting the spelling? Do you have some example text in a document that you could post as a snapshot that demonstrates the issue?

Hello RuthS!

I would say, whatever I set, but now I have set it to something like normal Text. So it so to say does nothing with the text in this regard, I guess.

Actually I do not have any issue writing In this regard as I do not write screenplays in Scrivener because it simply does not work. The issue is the big letters, I want them be capitalized to normal text. The screenshot would show only big letters. So just imagine a text with only big letters, no single small one.

OK, I just will try to achieve it with another program.

If a specific document is still in the scriptwriting mode or had been, then the text entered into it would be in all caps for certain parts of the script’s formatting.

And, that formatting will be retained even after scriptwriting mode is deactivated. You’ll need to retype those lines of text or use a website like Convert Case to correct the formatting.

You can copy the text from Scrivener, paste it into that website, convert it, and then use the Edit > Paste and Match Style command to paste the material back into Scrivener.

If you’re still new to Scrivener and how it works, the Help menu houses Scrivener’s Interactive Tutorial. It is a Scrivener project that we provide so that users can get hands-on practice navigating through Scrivener and learning about its features without using your own writing as a testing space.

I am a fan of using the Tutorial as a testing space when I’m learning about a new feature or want to practice with some new compile settings before using them with my own projects. That way, I can be a bit more fearless in trying things out without that gnawing anxiety that I’m “breaking” my project.

Many thanks for the link. Yes, looks like a great online program. But I am afraid there is not something like a “correct grammar / spelling capitalization” (and actually I wouldn’t like to upload the text to such a website).

Yes, that is a very good idea. Or one maybe just could copy one’s entire project and exactly try to achieve what one wants to achieve.

Is there an option in Scrivener to let ALL corrections be done in one doc in a single action (without having to intervene, not one by one and to descide on each single correction)?

Scrivener has a built-in spelling and grammar checker. It uses Hunspell dictionaries, which are open-source.

Some users prefer specific versions of the Hunspell dictionaries, and this Knowledge Base article explains changing the dictionary Scrivener uses.

Other users have subscriptions to Grammarly or ProWritingAid and use those with their Scrivener projects. Since we’re a small company, we don’t specifically design Scrivener to work with any third-party grammar and spelling tools.

If you’re already using a program like that, a number of threads here on the forum offer tips on working with those programs.

I personally won’t allow those programs to access my Scrivener project directly because they might change the RTF file names and cause issues with the Scrivener project’s internal index.

Instead, I set up an external folder as explained in §14.2 of the Scrivener 3 manual. When I have a chapter ready for grammar-checking, I’ll sync it to that external folder and use my grammar program to edit that folder’s contents.

Then I can import those changes back into Scrivener and continue to work from there.

That is great to know. Thank you very much! Also for the link!

May be I missed the answer. What I meant was this:
Is there an option in Scrivener to let ALL corrections be done in one doc in a single action (without having to intervene, not one by one and to descide on each single correction)?

The spelling and grammar check will be stepping through the document error by error to review each one and determine what action to take.

I suppose you could use a global Find and Replace, but I’ve been burned by that tool too many times just when changing one name or phrase to another. It’s how things like changing “Nick” to “Roger” ends up with someone breaking a “kRogerknack” in some part of my text if I’m lazy with the search and replace terms. :rofl:

I wouldn’t trust it with correcting a bunch of text that’s capitalized incorrectly if I wanted the end results to make sense.

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OK, so that is not possible, I assume:

Is there an option in Scrivener to let ALL corrections be done in one doc in a single action (without having to intervene, not one by one and to descide on each single correction)?

Yes, the best seems to make a copy before and maybe add a space for and after “Nick”, etc. Or to set “only whole words” and such.

I wouldn’t either at all. But it might be better than decide on each word which is an extremely big effort obvioulsy. And correcting single words does not work / is practically not possible with Scrivener here, too much delay in the various corrective actions.

Okey, thank you very much for your great help! Very much appreciated.