Today's Learning... Saving Versions of Draft into Research Folder

Kind of a “wow” in listening to the latest “Write Now with Scrivener” podcast (Episode 16). The author William Gallagher mentioned in passing he saves versions of his writing in the Research Folder. New to me. Just tried it. I used the ‘duplicate’ command to create “Draft-1” which then I dragged into the Research Folder. Doesn’t replace the automated/routine backups of everything (on open/close), but as a way to capture a current version of the manuscript before moving on with uncertain/experimental changes, seems pretty good for me.

I can’t think of downsides, but might be some for others.

Could it not be more efficient to use snapshots? Easily managed should you wish to revert to a previous version.

Have the windows version, but I use snapshots much more. You can add a title and say scene with argument, if want to see how scene would do if add argument. Thus can directly compare two snapshots and see differences highlighted. These snapshots show in the inspector and are easy to compare. I am using for editing as well as add or subtract details for flow of the book.
If want to save a draft, use save as and backup up whole project as draft one and have a saved copy seperate from current project and can compare later.
Overall favor snapshots as more granular.

I used the ‘duplicate’ command to create “Draft-1” which then I dragged into the Research Folder.

You don’t actually have to drag it into the Research folder btw, it can stay at the top level where it may be easier to access.

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And presumably will keep the number straight when the then duplication request comes in Draft-2, Draft-3, etc

But I still think that the extant snapshot feature is a more Scrivener thing to iuse.

Presumably. I did not try. Maybe you can try and compare with Snapshot.

But I still think that the extant snapshot feature is a more Scrivener thing to iuse.

Depending on what you’re trying to achieve. Sometimes, I just want to start over from scratch. I want to keep the previous attempt around for reference, but the new one may have a different arrangement or number of scenes.

As usual, it’s good that Scrivener provides flexibility for different workflows :slight_smile:

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For a total rewrite of project X I create a new one with a suitable name such as “X Rewrite”. Where I’m playing with narrative order and experiment with different sequence of scenes then I use a Collection.

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