What's the "recommended" way to handle revisions?

I noted yesterday while experimenting that, in the Novel template, you cannot “duplicate” your top level folder (“Manuscript”) in order to have two separate copies of your novel in the same project. Since “snapshots” are, as I understand it, limited to an active folder and its text, is it best “save as” when you want to begin a new revision?
Thanks!
John

I’d suggest creating a revision1 folder in the Draft folder. Select all of the files & folders in the main Draft folder and move them into the revision1 folder. Then duplicate the revision1 folder and name the new one “revision2”. If it’s not obvious, you could name these folders “Revision the first”, or “My very first version of my book, from which I hope to make a better book”. The name doesn’t matter, so long as it’s very clear to you which revision is which.

In the compile dialogue (Contents pane), you can select a sub-folder of the draft to be the top-level folder, so you can pick revision2 as the compile target, ignoring the original copy when you do test compiles. You can, of course, move the revision1 folder anywhere else in the binder, if you’re worried about editing the wrong one.

Thanks, Robert!
Should I assume that when you say “draft folder” you are referring to the level 1 “Manuscript” folder created by the Novel template? If so, then the level 1 “Manuscript” folder would have 1 to n “Revision N” subfolders beneath it, and those subfolders would contain the “Chapter” folders and their text subfolders. Sound right?
best regards
John

In short: Yes.

Longer answer: The Manuscript/Draft folder can be renamed, which is what they’ve done with some of the templates. You can rename it if you like too. It makes no difference to the workings of the program, but for the sake of discussion, the word “Draft”, which is the name of the folder when you choose a “Blank template”, is most often used.

MANY thanks!
John

And just a development note to add to that: we do intend to fix this so that you can hit “Duplicate” on the draft folder. This would not create a second draft folder, but it would create a new top-level folder with the entire draft contents in it. Right now the method described is a bit of a work-around since you can duplicate normal folders, but not the draft folder.

That will be great, thank you!!
John

Thought I would report back on this topic. I made a “revision” subfolder beneath Manuscript/Draft. Then I highlighted the first folder in Manuscript/Draft, scrolled down to the very last folder and highlighted that one. I then right clicked and told Scrivener to move everything to the “revision” subfolder I’d created. So far, so good, until I looked closely and saw that my folders had been scrambled (i.e., moved out of order). Yikes! I wonder what I (or Scrivener) did wrong.
Thanks!

The Move command does have a bug where it (I think) uses the underlying ID order rather than the Binder order. This is also an issue when bulk moving items using Collections. Drag and drop retains proper order.

Thanks!