Writing in the "background"

I’m struggling to explain this question so excuse my meandering.
I had used a code in the Editor so that what I wrote was kind of faded, like placeholders, or notes.
The text was faint compared with the usual black text. I forgot that code, and can’t find it in the manual.
I thought it was ##.

If you have any idea what I’m trying to talk about here, your help will be much appreciated.
Wanishi!

Louis

It appears my question wasn’t clear.
So, what is the code used in Editor so that text does not go with the project in Compile?
As I recall, it looks faint or grey.

Thanks

Since Scrivener doesn’t use formatting codes, I’m puzzled. You can use strike-through for this purpose, but it certainly doesn’t look grey. (It almost sounds like you’re confusing Scrivener with Ulysses, which has such a code that causes the text to have a grey appearance.)

In any event, to get this effect in Scrivener use strike-through and be sure to check the compile option “delete struck-through text.”

Hope this helps!

I appreciate your feedbacks but I’m really not confusing it with Ulysses.
It’s a feature that when compiling, “overlooks” what has been typed following the code.
I’ve used it, but can’t find it.
So, you’re inputting your story, then you put in a chunk of text that’s not ready to be used, or could be used and it’s there to go back to if and when.

When compiling, or when editing?

You can tell Scrivener to exclude Inline Annotations from the output document, but they’ll still be visible in the Editor.

(Cmd-Shift-A to toggle Inline Annotations on or off.)

Katherine

I beg your pardon, Louis. Strike-through and inline annotations (as Katherine suggested) are two ways I know of to achieve what you describe (text which appears in the editor but which doesn’t compile.) If you want grey colouring, inline annotations can be changed to grey by positioning your cursor inside one, using ctrl-cmd-c, and selecting a grey colour. Not only will that particular annotation turn grey, but all new annotations you make afterwards will also be grey.

Another possibility: You can create a style, and then modify your compile format to delete text of that style. You can set a keyboard shortcut to invoke that style.

Finally, if you work in an external editor in plain text (i.e. you use external folder sync with plain text files), in the external editor you may use doubled parentheses “(())” to enclose text that will become an inline annotation when you sync back to Scrivener. It doesn’t work directly in Scrivener, though.

Hope this helps! Sorry I can’t offer any suggestion that sounds more like what you describe (with codes).

Both, so I’m typing (is that what you mean by editing?), but I don’t want that particular text to go along when I compile.

I just did the Cmd-Shift-A so that’s the idea. The words were red and in a box. Can I change the color?

If you want grey colouring, inline annotations can be changed to grey by positioning your cursor inside one, using ctrl-cmd-c, and selecting a grey colour. Not only will that particular annotation turn grey, but all new annotations you make afterwards will also be grey.

Last question on this. How do you do strike -through?

Use the menu command Format->Font->Strikethrough, or shift-cmd-_ . It’s a little weird compared to the other character attributes like italics, because you have to have some text selected for it to work.

Hope this helps!

Thank you all very, very much.
With the powers granted to me through my Native heritage, I now deem you safe from Covid

Much appreciated!

I hope you don’t mind a minor nitpick, SD, but the shortcut for the colour palette is cmd-shift-c, not ctl-cmd-c, which is Copy paragraph attributes. (Sorry…)

:blush: :blush: